About Today

June 28

Saint Irenaeus, Bishop and Martyr

Memorial

“The Spirit of wisdom and understanding, the Spirit of counsel and strength, the Spirit of knowledge and the fear of God came down upon the Lord, and the Lord in turn gave this Spirit to his Church, sending the Advocate from heaven into all the world…” [1]

St. Irenaeus was an early Church Father in the 2nd century. He was mentored by St. Polycarp, himself a disciple of St. John the Evangelist. St. Irenaeus became Bishop of Lyons and fulfilled his calling as a prolific writer. Most notably, he defended the faith against the intellectual imperialism of the Gnostics; refuting their claims by defining truth as available to all. He said truth is public, unifying, and pneumatic (permeating). Additionally, St. Irenaeus helped identify the canon of scripture and the creed. [2][3]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

[1] Saint Irenaeus, ‘The sending of the Holy Spirit,’ in the treatise Against Heresies, prepared by the Spiritual Theology Department of the Pontifical University of the Holy Cross, www.vatican.va
[2] Catholicpedia: The Original Catholic Encyclopedia (1917) for iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. s.v. “St Irenaeus.”
[3] His Holiness Benedict XVI, “General Audience” March 28, 2007.

The English translation of The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes) ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Used with permission by Surgeworks, Inc for the Divine Office Catholic Ministry. DivineOffice.org website, podcast, apps and all related media is © 2006-2015 Surgeworks, Inc. All rights reserved.

About Today

June 21

Saint Aloysius Gonzaga, Religious

Memorial

St. Aloysius was heir to the affluent and powerful House of Gonzaga, a noble family in northern Italy in the 16th century. As a young boy, he was page to King Philip II of Spain’s son and trained to become a soldier until a kidney disease forced him to rest. After his recuperation, he renounced his wealth and title and announced his plans to enter the Jesuit order. He professed in 1587 at age 19. When the plague broke out in Rome in 1591, St. Aloysius volunteered to care for the infirm. He contracted the disease within four months and died shortly before his 23rd birthday. He was canonized in 1723 by Pope Benedict XIII and is the patron saint of Christian youth. [1]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

[1] Catholicpedia: The Original Catholic Encyclopedia (1917) for iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. s.v. “St. Aloysius Gonzaga.”

The English translation of The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes) ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Used with permission by Surgeworks, Inc for the Divine Office Catholic Ministry. DivineOffice.org website, podcast, apps and all related media is © 2006-2015 Surgeworks, Inc. All rights reserved.

Invitatory for Aug 17

Lord, open my lips. — And my mouth will proclaim your praise. Ant. Come, let us worship God, wonderful in his saints. Psalm 100 Cry out with joy to the Lord, all the earth. Serve the Lord with gladness. Come before him, singing for joy. Ant. Come, let us worship God, wonderful in his saints…. Enter Prayer

About Today

June 13

Saint Anthony of Padua, Priest and Doctor of the Church

Memorial

“What meekness of divine love! What patience of the Father’s kindness! How deep and unfathomable the secret of the eternal mind!”[1]

St. Anthony was the son of a wealthy Portuguese family in the 13th century. At fifteen, he became a canon regular at the Abbey of St. Vincent. Later, he studied theology at the prestigious Abbey of the Holy Cross in Coimbra, Portugal.

In his role as guestmaster at the abbey, St. Anthony befriended Franciscan friars who were soon martyred in Morocco. Inspired by their tragic heroism, he became Franciscan and was sent to Morocco as a missionary. In Africa, he became very ill and left to go to Italy. There he met St. Francis and was called to preaching. This supreme gift took him all the way to the papal court, where he served under Pope Gregory IX and was commissioned to write a collection of sermons. He died at 36 and was declared a Doctor of the Church by Pope Pius XII in 1946. [2][3]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

[1] Anthony of Padua, Quinquagesima, www.basilica.org/pages/ebooks.
[2] Catholicpedia: The Original Catholic Encyclopedia (1917) for iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. s.v. “St. Anthony.”
[3] Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, The Martyrology of the Monastery of the Ascension, 2008.

The English translation of The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes) ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Used with permission by Surgeworks, Inc for the Divine Office Catholic Ministry. DivineOffice.org website, podcast, apps and all related media is © 2006-2015 Surgeworks, Inc. All rights reserved.

About Today

June 11

Saint Barnabas, Apostle

Memorial

“But when the apostles Barnabas and Paul heard of it, they tore their garments and rushed out among the multitude, crying, ‘Men, why are you doing this? We also are men, of like nature with you, and bring you good news, that you should turn from these vain things to a living God who made the heaven and the earth and the sea and all that is in them’” (Acts 14:14).[1]

St Barnabas, named Joseph at the time of his birth, was a Levite and one of the first to embrace the Christian way. Although he was not one of the Twelve, St. Luke refers to him as an “apostle.” After hearing the apostles’ testimony in Jerusalem, he sold a field that he owned and laid the money down at their feet. St Barnabas was a friend to St Paul and brought him to the apostles, when Paul went to Jerusalem and wanted to redeem his reputation. Next, St Barnabas was commissioned to go to Antioch to shepherd the Gentile converts. He invited St Paul and they met with the city’s infant church and instructed them for a year. Afterwards, he traveled through Asia Minor and was a respected missionary and advisor. St. Luke describes St Barnabas as encourager, “… a good man, full of the Holy Spirit and of faith” (Acts 4:36, 11:24). [2][3]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

[1] Revised Standard Version, s.v., “The Acts of the Apostles.”
[2] Catholicpedia: The Original Catholic Encyclopedia (1917) for iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. s.v. “St. Barnabas.”
[3] Revised Standard Version, s.v., “The Acts of the Apostles.”

The English translation of The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes) ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Used with permission by Surgeworks, Inc for the Divine Office Catholic Ministry. DivineOffice.org website, podcast, apps and all related media is © 2006-2015 Surgeworks, Inc. All rights reserved.

Invitatory for Aug 17

Lord, open my lips. — And my mouth will proclaim your praise. Ant. Let us sing to the Lord as we celebrate the Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, alleluia. Psalm 95 Come, let us sing to the Lord and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us. Let us approach him with praise… Enter Prayer

Liturgy of the Hours for August 17


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