About Today

Saint John, Apostle and Evangelist by Carlo Dolci [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

December 27

Saint John, Apostle and Evangelist

Feast

St. John was a fisherman with his father, Zebedee, and brother, James, at the Sea of Galilee. To the brothers, Jesus bestowed the title “sons of thunder.” This beloved disciple participated in many of Jesus’ more private events including the raising of Jairus’ daughter, the Transfiguration, and the tender bestowing of his Mother Mary to St. John at the foot of the cross. He is credited with writing the Fourth Gospel.

St. John, “the disciple whom Jesus loved,” was the only one of the apostles to die not of martyrdom but of old age, around the year 100. Still, he has been honored as a martyr from the earliest days after his death, because of an incident related by Tertullian, in which John, while in Rome, was placed in a pot of boiling oil but emerged unharmed. The love which Jesus bears is never barren. Of this his sufferings and death are the strongest proof. As St. John had the happiness to be distinguished by Christ in his holy love, so was he also in its glorious effects.[1][2][3][4]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

[1] Catholicpedia: The Original Catholic Encyclopedia (1917) for iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. s.v. “St. John the Evangelist.”
[2] Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, The Martyrology of the Monastery of the Ascension, 2008.
[3] “Saint John, Apostle and Evangelist” by Scott P. Richert, http://catholicism.about.com.
[4] Rev. Alban Butler, The Lives or the Fathers, Martyrs and Other Principal Saints, Vol. IV

The English translation of The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes) ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.. Used with permission. All rights reserved. The DivineOffice.org website, podcast, apps and all related media follows the liturgical calendar for the United States. The 1970 edition of the New American Bible as published in the Liturgy of the Hours is approved for use only in the United States. DivineOffice.org website, podcast, apps and all related media is © 2006-2022 Surgeworks, Inc. All rights reserved.

Invitatory

https://media.blubrry.com/divineoffice/traffic.libsyn.com/divineoffice/divine-1228-ip-psalm24.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 3:09 — 3.4MB)Lord, open my lips. — And my mouth will proclaim your praise. Ant. Come, let us worship the newborn Christ who crowns with joy these children who died for him. Psalm 24 The Lord’s is the earth and its fullness, the world and all its… Enter Prayer

About Today

Saint Lawrence By Luis Fernández (c. 1594 -1654) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

August 10

Saint Lawrence, Deacon and Martyr

Feast

St. Lawrence was a deacon in the 3rd century. He suffered martyrdom during Emperor Valerian’s persecution, shortly after Pope Saint Sixtus II and Companions were killed. St. Ambrose of Milan wrote about St. Lawrence and said when the prefect of Rome demanded the Church’s treasures, St. Lawrence brought forth the poor, widowed, maimed and lepers. He declared these people greater than any treasure the emperor could possess. Constantine the Great built an oratory over his burial site which has been enlarged and beautified by successive rulers. It remains today as the basilica of San Lorenzo. [1][2]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

[1] Catholicpedia: The Original Catholic Encyclopedia (1917) for iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. s.v. “St. Lawrence.”
[2] Herbert J. Thurston, S.J. and Donald Attwater, Butler’s Lives of the Saints Volume 3 (Indiana: Ave Maria Press, Inc., 1956), 297.

The English translation of The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes) ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.. Used with permission. All rights reserved. The DivineOffice.org website, podcast, apps and all related media follows the liturgical calendar for the United States. The 1970 edition of the New American Bible as published in the Liturgy of the Hours is approved for use only in the United States. DivineOffice.org website, podcast, apps and all related media is © 2006-2022 Surgeworks, Inc. All rights reserved.

About Today

The Visitation By Jerónimo Ezquerra (1660–1737) (http://www.carmenthyssenmalaga.org/) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

May 31

The Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Feast

“Sing aloud, O daughter of Zion; shout, O Israel! Rejoice and exult with all your heart, O daughter of Jerusalem!” (Zeph 3:14). [1]

Today marks the day Mary visited her cousin Elizabeth. Upon hearing Mary’s greeting, Elizabeth – filled with the Holy Spirit, proclaimed, “Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb!”

Mary’s response to Elizabeth’s greeting has become known as her Magnificat. With a bold yet humble spirit, she proclaimed the greatness of the Lord, which raises up the lowly. The feast invites us to share in Mary’s wonder and imitate her visit to those who need a kind word or a helping hand. [2]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

[1] Revised Standard Version, s.v. “Zephaniah, The Book of.”
[2] Benedict XVI, “Address for Feast of the Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary” May 31, 2008.

The English translation of The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes) ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.. Used with permission. All rights reserved. The DivineOffice.org website, podcast, apps and all related media follows the liturgical calendar for the United States. The 1970 edition of the New American Bible as published in the Liturgy of the Hours is approved for use only in the United States. DivineOffice.org website, podcast, apps and all related media is © 2006-2022 Surgeworks, Inc. All rights reserved.

About Today

Třeboň Altarpiece: Saint James the Less, Saint Bartholomew, Saint Philip by Master of the Třeboň Altarpiece [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

May 3

Philip and James, Apostles

Feast

“The next day Jesus decided to go to Galilee. And he found Philip and said to him, ‘Follow me’” (Jn 1:43). [1]

St. Philip was one of Jesus’ early disciples. Jesus called to him, Philip followed, and Philip invited Nathanial to join Jesus, too. Some Greeks came to him to be introduced to Jesus. [2]

According to tradition, St. James was the James the Less referred to in Mark 15:40 and was a prominent leader of the church in Jerusalem. [3]

These saints remind us that the Gospel is invitational and that Christ’s message is available for all mankind.

Written by Sarah Ciotti
[1] Revised Standard Version, sv., “John, The Gosepl According To.”
[2] Catholicpedia: The Original Catholic Encyclopedia (1917) for iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. s.v. “St. Philip”
[3] Catholicpedia: The Original Catholic Encyclopedia (1917) for iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. s.v. “St. James the Less.”

The English translation of The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes) ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.. Used with permission. All rights reserved. The DivineOffice.org website, podcast, apps and all related media follows the liturgical calendar for the United States. The 1970 edition of the New American Bible as published in the Liturgy of the Hours is approved for use only in the United States. DivineOffice.org website, podcast, apps and all related media is © 2006-2022 Surgeworks, Inc. All rights reserved.

Liturgy of the Hours for December 02