About Today

Saint Thomas Aquinas By 18th-century Portuguese School (Veritas Art Auctioneers) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

January 28

Saint Thomas Aquinas, Priest and Doctor of the Church

Memorial

“Everything imperfect must proceed from something perfect: therefore the First Being must be most perfect. Everything is perfect inasmuch as it is in actuality; imperfect, inasmuch as it is in potentiality, with privation of actuality. That then which is nowise in potentiality, but is pure actuality, must be most perfect; and such is God.” [1]

For human beings perfection is found in discipleship to Christ.

St. Thomas Aquinas was born in Aquino, Italy, in 1225, the youngest son of Count Landulf. St. Aquinas received his education at the Abbey of Montecassino and at the University of Naples. In 1244, St. Aquinas entered the Dominican Order. He traveled to Paris and Cologne, studying under St. Albert the Great. He became a Master of Theology at Paris and subsequently, taught there and in Italy. He wrote a series of commentaries on the newly translated works of Aristotle to guide Christians in their reading of them. He wrote the Summa theologiae and much of the liturgy for the feast of Corpus Christi. He was declared a Doctor of the Church in 1567 by Pius V who called him the Doctor Angelicus. [2][3][4][5]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

[1] St. Thomas Aquinas, “That God is Universal Perfection,” in Of God and His Creatures, 64, www.ccel.org.
[2] Benedict XVI, General Audience, June 2, 2010.
[3] F.L. Cross and E.A. Livingstone, The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (London: Oxford University Press, 1974), 1371-1373.
[4] Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, The Martyrology of the Monastery of the Ascension, 2008.
[5] Catholicpedia: The Original Catholic Encyclopedia (1917) for iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. s.v. “St. Thomas Aquinas.”

The English translation of The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes) ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.. Used with permission. All rights reserved. The DivineOffice.org website, podcast, apps and all related media follows the liturgical calendar for the United States. The 1970 edition of the New American Bible as published in the Liturgy of the Hours is approved for use only in the United States. DivineOffice.org website, podcast, apps and all related media is © 2006-2022 Surgeworks, Inc. All rights reserved.

Invitatory

https://media.blubrry.com/divineoffice/traffic.libsyn.com/divineoffice/divine-ip-common-of-doctors.psalm095.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 4:13 — 3.5MB)Lord, open my lips. — And my mouth will proclaim your praise. Ant. Come, let us worship the Lord, fount of all wisdom, alleluia. Psalm 95 Come, let us sing to the Lord and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us. Let us… Enter Prayer

Liturgy of the Hours for November 29