Invitatory

Lord, open my lips.
And my mouth will proclaim your praise.

Ant. Come, let us worship Christ, the King of martyrs.

Psalm 95

Come, let us sing to the Lord
and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us.
Let us approach him with praise and thanksgiving
and sing joyful songs to the Lord.

Ant. Come, let us worship Christ, the King of martyrs.

The Lord is God, the mighty God,
the great king over all the gods.
He holds in his hands the depths of the earth
and the highest mountains as well
He made the sea; it belongs to him,
the dry land, too, for it was formed by his hands.

Ant. Come, let us worship Christ, the King of martyrs.

Come, then, let us bow down and worship,
bending the knee before the Lord, our maker,
For he is our God and we are his people,
the flock he shepherds.

Ant. Come, let us worship Christ, the King of martyrs.

Today, listen to the voice of the Lord:
Do not grow stubborn, as your fathers did
in the wilderness,
when at Meriba and Massah
they challenged me and provoked me,
Although they had seen all of my works.

Ant. Come, let us worship Christ, the King of martyrs.

Forty years I endured that generation.
I said, “They are a people whose hearts go astray
and they do not know my ways.”
So I swore in my anger,
“They shall not enter into my rest.”

Ant. Come, let us worship Christ, the King of martyrs.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Come, let us worship Christ, the King of martyrs.

The English translation of The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes) ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.. Used with permission. All rights reserved. The DivineOffice.org website, podcast, apps and all related media follows the liturgical calendar for the United States. The 1970 edition of the New American Bible as published in the Liturgy of the Hours is approved for use only in the United States. DivineOffice.org website, podcast, apps and all related media is © 2006-2022 Surgeworks, Inc. All rights reserved.

About Today

Saint Charles Lwanga and Companions By Albert Wider [Copyrighted free use], via Wikimedia Commons

June 3

Saint Charles Lwanga and Companions, Martyrs

Memorial

“Kristu abagumye
Era abawe omukisa.

May Christ comfort you,
and may he bless you”
[1]

Today is the Memorial of St. Charles Lwanga and Companions, the martyrs of Uganda. Charles Lwanga was a page in the royal court of Mwanga, the king of the Baganda in the south of what is now Uganda. Mwanga was young and his country was under many outside pressures. He became mentally unstable and increasingly hostile to Christians. When Joseph Mkasa, the master of the pages and a Catholic catechist, tried to protect the younger pages from the rages and sexual advances of the king, Joseph was beheaded. Charles Lwanga, also a Catholic, was appointed to succeed him. One morning the king assembled the pages and told those who were Christians to stand apart. When they said they intended to remain Christians, they were burned to death. One of their executioners reported that the young men prayed softly as they died. Those martyred by Mwanga included both Catholics and other Christians. Charles and his companions were beatified in 1920 and canonized in 1964. St. Charles Lwanga is the patron saint of African youth.[2][3][4]

Written by Sarah Ciotti
Reviewed by Fr. Hugh Feiss, OSB, STD

[1] John Paul II, Apostolic Blessing during Pastoral Journey to Uganda, February 7, 1993.
[2] Paul VI, in “Letter of his Holiness John Paul II to Cardinal James Knox,” January 17, 1979, www.vatican.va.
[3] Catholic News Agency, St. Charles Lwanga and Companions, June 3, 2013.
[4] Butler’s Lives of the Saints. New Full Edition. June. Ed. Kathleen Jones (Collegeville: Liturgical Press, 1997), 22-24.

The English translation of The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes) ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.. Used with permission. All rights reserved. The DivineOffice.org website, podcast, apps and all related media follows the liturgical calendar for the United States. The 1970 edition of the New American Bible as published in the Liturgy of the Hours is approved for use only in the United States. DivineOffice.org website, podcast, apps and all related media is © 2006-2022 Surgeworks, Inc. All rights reserved.

Liturgy of the Hours for November 26